Glossary Intro and Glossary Annexes
A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Glossary M

Mandrel

Manual

see Woodworker's Manual See examples in the Woodworker's Manuals sections.

Marking Gauge

The marking gauge marks a line parallel to the edge of a workpiece.

marking guage

Marking gauges are of two types: Some marking gauges have sixteenth-inch graduations along the beam, while others are unmarked and require setting with a rule. The "unmarked" type is shown in the jpg on the left.






Marking Knife

The professional woodworker and contributing editor to Woodworker’s Journal [date ?] Ian Kirby, notes his preference for a marking knife “is a two-blade Swiss Army knife. Its size and shape”, he claims, “allows for complete control and pressure at the cutting edge.” The blade, thin, but sturdy and easily sharpened, also cuts veneers.

Marquetry

Matchers

Measurement

Mechanic

see also Craftsman, Cabinetmaker, Woodworker .

Mechanic is, according to Stephen Shepherd, an old term for Craftsman

Source: Stephen Shepherd, Shepherd's Compleat Early Nineteenth Century Woodworker Green River Forge G.S.L.C., Utah , 1981, page 35. (Not online, this book is said to be "...the ultimate tome on working with wood the old fashioned way, sans power tools, sans high-tech." Smithsonian Magazine 13, No 1 April 1982 Vol. 13.)

Medium Density Fiberboard

(MDF)

[Fabricated out of compressed wood fibers. Used for furniture and trim that will be painted. Also used in woodshop for table tops on shopmade power tool stands, and for creating Jigs. Machines well. Doesn't hold threaded screws securely.] Will eventually discuss MDF and Particle Board together, but not Plywood


Melamine

Manufactured sheets of 4' x 8' particle board, used as a base for vacuum press gluing.

Milled Timber

Mineral Spirits (MS)

Used as a general solvent in the shop for dilution of finishes and cleaning of brushes/equipment. A light wipe down will reveal glue spots and show the color of the wood after finishing.

Miter

An angled cut, used for creating Joints in many woodworking applications. See Miter Joint

Miter Fence

The sliding fence used for cross cutting on the table saw. Usually the fence can be adjusted for various angles (miters) of crosscut.

Miter Saw

See also Chop Saw.

Miter Square

also Miter gauge (sp. Mitergage) R A Salaman, Dictionary of Woodworking Tools Newtown, CT: Taunton Press, 1989, pages 476-477, gives several examples.

Moisture Meters

See also Appendix 8: The Anatomy and Physiology of Wood The moisture content of wood can be determined by using an Electric Moisture Meter. Meters are usually calibrated to cover a range from 7 to 25 percent with an accuracy of plus or minus 1 percent of the moisture content.

Two types of meters are available: One determines the moisture content by measuring the electrical resistance between two pin-type electrodes that are driven into the wood. The other types measures the capacity of a condenser in a high-frequency circuit in which the wood serves as the dielectric material of the condenser.

Molder

Molding

A "molding" is a workpiece -- such as the Stile and Rails of some Cabinet doors -- with a profiled surface, the Profile created by a Moulder (also Moulding Machine) Router or a Shaper.

Molding Cutterhead

See Shaper Cutter

Miter Slot: and/or Miter Square:

Morse Taper

see entry, Morse Taper

Mortise

As in "mortise and tenon", a mortise and tenon makes a very strong joint. A mortise is a hole in a workpiece -- it can be round, square, rectangular, or whatever shape needed -- designed to receive a tenon.(In woodworking joints, a tenon has a function that is similar to a Dowel, Biscuit.
Click here for a more extensive entry on this important term

Mortise and Tenon Joint

Mortise and Tenon Joint

Mullion

"... strips [of wood] between any sort of panel, such as Wainscoting."

Source: Philip Leon, "Woodworker Meets Wordworker," Popular Woodworking April 2002, page 88. ["Out of the Woodwork" column, Philip Leon, "Woodworker Meets Wordworker."]